IB Reflection: Atmospheric Perspective and Figure Drawing

 

Add this to your existing Process Portfolio document.

How to Write a Reflection:

For each artwork (Atmospheric Perspective and Figure Drawing), I want you to create 1-2 pages per artwork (3 if you have a lot to say and plenty of visuals) about the artwork.  On these pages, you can talk about or include any of the following things:

  • Photographs of your artwork, which may include detail shots
  • Photographs of the model, if you had one
  • Any progress photos you had
  • Discussion of what it was like to work with medium, which could include what you found easy, what you found difficult, and any tips or techniques that you learned or discovered along the way
  • Discussion of what it was like to work with your selected technique, which could include what you found easy, what you found difficult, and any tips or techniques that you learned or discovered along the way
  • Discussion of any artistic influences that effected your work
  • A description of what you were trying to depict or show with your artwork
  • Your judgement of how the artwork turned out (was it successful, where did you fall short, what could you do better, etc.)
  • Any potential ideas or goals for future artworks

Note that this is not a definitive list, nor do you have to do everything on the list.  These are merely suggestions to help guide you.

What Your Page(s) Must Have

  • A title or header, so we know what this page is about
  • Something visual on every single page (you can have more than 1 photo per page)
  • A border (do not go edge-to-edge with your work)
  • Text that demonstrates your thinking and/or reflections
  • Citations for any images or quotes that come from someone other than you
  • Transcribing of any handwritten text that is in a photo, but is not legible

Sample Pages

The images below are a collection of sample Process Portfolio pages, to help work as a guide.

Due Date

These reflections are due Monday, 2/24, by 11:00 p.m.  This is a formative grade.  Just have your PowerPoint or Keynote sitting in the shared folder, and I will grade it from there.

Tips on Photographing your Work

For the best photos, photograph your work as it hangs vertically on a surface, and with it evenly lit.  Anything else can cause weird shadows, glare, or strange cambering of your image.

This is most easily done by borrowing a few magnets from me, hanging your work on the whiteboard, and photographing it there, in  class.

It may be necessary, particularly with sculpture, to light it.  We do have a few clamp lights in the classroom just for this purpose.

You may want to crop your photo to just the image, removing any trace of the background surface and/or margin border.

My Role in All of This

I am a facilitator and an editor.  I can help you if you need access to photos, cameras, or software.  I will point out things that are good or bad with your pages.  But in the end, this is completely your work and your submission.  You have final call when it comes to your Process Portfolio, and assembling it is completely your responsibility.  Let me know how I can help so that you can have the best submission possible.

 

Posted in IB Art

AP Find Me: Renaissance and Baroque Concepts

Your assignment is to find images that demonstrate each of the following terms or techniques.  Some of these terms we have covered, but some we have not yet so you will have to do some light researching.

For the images I only want graphic, advertising, popular, or contemporary art.  I do not want any images that could be associated with fine art, your textbook, or anyone who died before 1990.  I want you to see that the art terms we are learning about are still vital and being used today.  Good sources include magazines, comic books and graphic novels, stills from games and movies, and the vast internet.

You may submit this as a PowerPoint, Prezi, Word document, or even as a set of index cards.  However you choose, be sure to include the term, the image, and a brief definition.

  • Contrapposto
  • Fete Galante
  • Genre (the everyday)
  • Portraiture
  • Mechanical Perspective
  • Sfumato
  • Tenebrism
  • An informally balanced composition

Due by Monday, 2/24, by 11 pm.  This is a formative grade.

Posted in Art History

IB High Contrast Photos

This homework assignment is designed to generate more work for your process portfolio and also syncs well with our current in class assignment.

By contrast I mean a visual contrast; a strong difference in color, texture, or value.

If you wish to explore a contrast in visual meaning or subject, that is fine, but try to really hone in on the aesthetic side rather than the content or meaning side of the work.

Some examples of what I am talking about, drawn from art historical as well as contemporary sources.  The examples I chose are predominantly black and white, but color photos can work as well:

Additional Things to Know

  • For this assignment I want you to turn in a total of 5 different photos that demonstrate high contrast.  That will give us the ability to go through your photos and select your best ones to use for your portfolio.
  • Try to keep all your editing down to what you see through the lens of your camera.  You may crop after the fact, but don’t Photoshop, add filters, or in other ways manipulate your image.
  • Look for strong juxtapositions, where the objects/values/colors/textures are in close positions to each other.

This is due Tuesday, 2/18, by 11:00 p.m.  Place these photos in their own folder (that you make) within your Process Portfolio sub-folder.  This is a formative grade.

Posted in IB Art

IB Depth of Field Photo

For this assignment I want you to play around with photography a bit.

You are to take a series of 5 original photos.  Your photos are to have the following characteristics:

  1. Choose subjects where you can play with depth of field. Also sometimes called field of focus, depth of field is an optical effect where some objects in the picture are sharply in focus, and other parts are blurry and out of focus.  Photographers will take advantage of the mechanics of the camera to create interesting photos that can create emphasis, help express distance, and/or lend itself to abstraction.  Depth of Field can be created on most cameras by just focusing on one object in your view finder, and then letting the rest naturally dissolve into out-of-focus shapes and colors.  On an iPhone, the camera will focus on the part of the image that you tap.  Getting close to a subject, or focusing on a far away subject, can also help create this effect.
  2. Submit 5 different photos.  We are submitting several photos so that we can select the best one to include in your Process Portfolio.

This is due Monday, 2/10, by 11 p.m.  This is a formative grade.  Your 5 photos should be placed in your process portfolio, and labeled as  “Depth of Field #”

Bellow are some examples:

 

 

Posted in IB Art

AP Timeline: Rome to Renaissance

You are to construct an original timeline.  The timeline must do the following things:

  • The timeline must include the required artworks, artistic periods, and historic dates listed below.
  • The timeline must demonstrate the sequential nature of some of these events.
  • The timeline must also demonstrate the overlapping nature of some of these events.  How you choose to do this is up to you.
  • The timeline must include dates/centuries/time markers that place each period and each artwork in the correct time frame.  How you choose to do this is up to you.

Your timeline should be clear, concise, and regardless of how it is constructed, submitted electronically through an email or link.  PowerPoint, Word document, jpeg file, Prezi, or even an online timeline creator is fine.  No hard copies. Your textbook does have a timeline at the end of each chapter, which may be helpful.

This is a formative grade and is due by Monday, 2/3, at 11:00 p.m.  Your product will be evaluated not only for its thoroughness, correctness, and clarity.  Your submission should be sent to my school email:  james.elam@killeenisd.org.

Required Artworks

  • Bayeux Tapestry
  • Chartres Cathedral
  • David, by Michelangelo
  • Hagia Sophia
  • Lamentation by Giotto
  • Lindisfarne Gospels
  • Reliquary of Sainte-Foy
  • Rottgen Pieta
  • Sacrifice of Isaac by Gilberti
  • Santa Sabina
  • Virgin (Theotokos) and Child between Saints

Required Art Periods

  • Gothic
  • Late Antiquity
  • Romanesque
  • Renaissance

Required Historic Dates

  • 325 CE, Council of Nicea
  • 1066 CE, Battle of Hastings
  • 1337 CE, One Hundred Years’ War begins
  • 1492 CE, Columbus
  • 1648 CE, Treaty of Westphalia
Posted in Art History

IB Reflection: Value Study, Isometric Perspective, and Broken Color

For this homework assignment, we are going to begin building our Process Portfolio pages.

Create a Document

Your reflections are to be recorded in PowerPoint, or Pages, whichever you have access too and are more familiar with.  If you have issues having access to these programs, they are available to you on the computers in my classroom.

For every reflection we do, we are going to add them to this document.

For those who were with me last year, we are just adding these new pages to the document you already have.

Your document should be titled as follows:

Your Name

Process Portfolio Draft

How to Write a Reflection

For each artwork (Value Study, Isomoetric Perspective, and the Broken Color Painting), I want you to create 1-2 pages per artwork (3 if you have a lot to say and plenty of visuals) about the artwork.  On these pages, you can talk about or include any of the following things:

  • Photographs of your artwork, which may include detail shots
  • Photographs of the model, if you had one
  • Any progress photos you had
  • Discussion of what it was like to work with medium, which could include what you found easy, what you found difficult, and any tips or techniques that you learned or discovered along the way
  • Discussion of what it was like to work with your selected technique, which could include what you found easy, what you found difficult, and any tips or techniques that you learned or discovered along the way
  • Discussion of any artistic influences that effected your work
  • A description of what you were trying to depict or show with your artwork
  • Your judgement of how the artwork turned out (was it successful, where did you fall short, what could you do better, etc.)
  • Any potential ideas or goals for future artworks

Note that this is not a definitive list, nor do you have to do everything on the list.  These are merely suggestions to help guide you.

What Your Page(s) Must Have

  • A title or header, so we know what this page is about
  • Something visual on every single page (you can have more than 1 photo per page)
  • A border (do not go edge-to-edge with your work)
  • Text that demonstrates your thinking and/or reflections
  • Citations for any images or quotes that come from someone other than you
  • Transcribing of any handwritten text that is in a photo, but is not legible

Sample Pages

The images below are a collection of sample Process Portfolio pages, to help work as a guide.

Due Date

These reflections are due Monday, 2/3, by 11:00 p.m.  This is a formative grade.  Just have your PowerPoint or Keynote sitting in the shared folder, and I will grade it from there.

Tips on Photographing your Work

For the best photos, photograph your work as it hangs vertically on a surface, and with it evenly lit.  Anything else can cause weird shadows, glare, or strange cambering of your image.

This is most easily done by borrowing a few magnets from me, hanging your work on the whiteboard, and photographing it there, in  class.

It may be necessary, particularly with sculpture, to light it.  We do have a few clamp lights in the classroom just for this purpose.

You may want to crop your photo to just the image, removing any trace of the background surface and/or margin border.

My Role in All of This

I am a facilitator and an editor.  I can help you if you need access to photos, cameras, or software.  I will point out things that are good or bad with your pages.  But in the end, this is completely your work and your submission.  You have final call when it comes to your Process Portfolio, and assembling it is completely your responsibility.  Let me know how I can help so that you can have the best submission possible.

 

Posted in IB Art

First Exhibition Sketch

On Wednesday we begin our first exhibition pieces.  In order to make sure you are ready, what we need is a working sketch for your first piece.

Remember that your idea should configure with your statement you just drafted or updated.

You may want to use one of the sketches you just generated for me, or you may be creating something new.  Either is fine, I just need to see that you have a firm plan in mind for the 29th, when we start.

Also remember that you get to choose the medium you are working with for your project.  I recommend that you choose a medium you are familiar with and strong.  You may also want to verify that any materials you need are here in the class.  If they are not, we may need to see if the other art teachers can loan us something, or you may need to secure your own materials.

You will have only 10 working days in class for each exhibition piece.

Upload or show me a sketch in person by Tuesday, 1/28, 11:00 p.m.  This is a formative grade.

Posted in IB Art

AP Museum Assignment: The Impact of Presentation, Scale, and Text

Quite a bit of how we feel about a work is determined by how we encounter it for the first time.  Artwork seen in person is nothing like artwork seen in a book or on a screen.

Another important element of how we react to an art work is placement and scale.  The size of the work, how it is lit, and where on a wall it is placed can do a lot to obscure or elevate a work of art; to draw our attention to it.  We tend to favor work that catches our eye.

One more thing which can impact our opinion of a work is the plaque next to the work.  Increasingly within museums we are seeing plaques next to artwork with a descriptive narrative.  This narrative might give insight into the work’s meaning, biographical information, or anything else the curators felt should be shared about the work.

What I want you to do is choose three works (total) from either of the museums.  Select works that “floor” you.  Select artworks which have a strong or dramatic impact upon you, the viewer.  I want you to discuss how the work is displayed, and the impact of the narrative next to it on your opinion.

Begin by just looking at the art work in terms of the work itself, and then how it is displayed.  Only after you think you understand the artwork should you read the narrative.  Figure out if the narrative in any way changes your opinion.

You should write roughly a paragraph each for each work (3 total).  That paragraph should include:

  • Title, artist’s name, and size
  • Brief description of its appearance
  • Description of your impression or feelings about the work
  • Description of how it is displayed (wall space, light, etc.)
  • Brief summary of any narrative accompanying the work
  • Explain what impact the narrative had on your perception of the work

This brief writing assignment will be due by 11:00 p.m. on Tuesday, 1/21.  This is a Formative grade.  Submit your assignment by email:  james.elam@killeenisd.org.

Posted in Art History

IB A Coherent Body of Work

The first problem any painter faces is what to paint.  Before we lift a brush we need to know why.

We have been looking at different artists to try and help start up some inspiration within you, and to get you to think about what it is you have an interest in as an artist.  We have also looked at styles and themes.

With this assignment we will start thinking about a “theme” that can be a guiding principle for your work.

A Coherent Body of Work
The Exhibition, a component of your IB Art portfolio, requires your work to demonstrate a “theme” that unifies and connects all of the individual works in the show.  What they really mean is that it must look like a coherent body of work; works that show that you have a vision, style, or message and know how to convey that over a series of works.

A coherent body of work can be created Three different ways:

  • Style:  the works all fit within a similar visual aesthetic.  Cubism would be a fantastic example of this, where the subject does not matter, but how the subject is depicted does.
  • Theme:  the work follows the same topic, content, or narrative throughout the work.  An example would be a series of paintings that talk about nature and man’s place within it, or a series of drawings dealing with feminist issues.
  • Technique:  the works are all related because the artist explores the same material or artistic technique throughout their body of work.

Examples of Coherent Theme
These 4 images are all by Mary Cassatt, an American Impressionist who depicted the day-to-day domestic lives of upper class women.  Even though there are some differences in stylistic appearance between the works, they all serve as this window into the private world of these women.

Examples of Coherent Style
These images by Picasso demonstrate his coherent style.  While his topics would widely vary, the way he depicted space and the human form followed the rules of Cubism–rules set by him.

Examples of Coherent Technique
El Anatsui is a contemporary artist coming from Africa, with a unique body of work.  He crafts large, hanging tapestries from bits and pieces of foil wrappers from wine and liquor bottles, bottle caps, and pull tabs from beer cans.  While there is a coherent message about consumerism, the effects of alcohol on society, and colonialism, what is most striking is his choice of materials and technique.  Even if you did not get the backstory behind his work, his manner of working makes his material instantly recognizable.

Pick a Theme:
I want you to pick a theme.  This may be the theme you already had from last year, or this may be something brand new.  Keep in mind, I’m saying theme, but I mean “coherent body of work,” so your theme can be a theme, a style, a technique, or a combination of those.

for your homework I want you to write a paragraph two paragraphs.  The first paragraph should state what your theme or style is.  Your second paragraph should state why you are exploring this theme or style. Keep in mind this is the foundation of your artwork for this semester.

Thumbnail Sketches
A thumbnail sketch refers to a quick small sketch than an artist makes to start planning out or visualizing something they want to make.  The name refers to the idea of it being a small sketch, but in truth they may be as large as a whole sketchbook page.  Quality-wise, they are somewhere between a doodle and a finished work of art.

For your homework assignment I want you to create 3 thumbnail sketches to go with your theme or style.   I want each thumbnail to be different, and yet still strive to match your stated theme or style.

Homework
So In total I want you give me the following

  • a paragraph (or more) stating your theme or style
  • 3 thumbnail sketches of ideas (paintings, sculptures, whatever) that can fit with that theme

This is due Monday, 1/13, by the beginning of class.  Turn this in via a brand new PowerPoint titled Exhibition, and put this PowerPoint in your Exhibition Folder.  This is a formative grade.

Posted in IB Art

AP Where the Red Art Grows

Provenance:  the place of origin or earliest known history of something.  It is also the focus of this assignment.

The following is a released question which appeared on an AP test a few years ago.  Your assignment is to fully answer the question being asked of you, as if you were taking an AP test.  You are allowed, and encouraged, to do any and all research needed to answer this question.  Like with all good AP writing, you need to cite specific artworks as examples for the points you are trying to make.

This is due Monday, 1/13, by 11:00 p.m.  This is a formative grade.  You are to submit your responses to me via email.

Your question:
In order to understand works of art fully, one must understand their original or intended settings.  For example, most works of art in museums have been removed from their original settings.  Often a work’s original setting has been altered or destroyed or was never completed as planned.

Fully identify two works of art that have been removed from their original settings.  Each example must come from different original or intended settings.  Discuss how knowledge of the original settings contributes to a more complete understanding of each work.

Posted in Art History